A Modified Determination of Coenzyme Q10 in Human Blood and CoQ10 Blood Levels in Diverse Patients with Allergies
 
   

A Modified Determination of Coenzyme Q10
in Human Blood and CoQ10 Blood Levels
in Diverse Patients with Allergies

This section is compiled by Frank M. Painter, D.C.
Send all comments or additions to:
   Frankp@chiro.org
 
   

FROM:   Biofactors 1988 (Dec);   1 (4):   303306

Ye CQ, Folkers K, Tamagawa H, Pfeiffer C

Institute for Biomedical Research,
University of Texas, Austin


Two situations required a modified determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in human blood and organ tissue. Blood from patients with AIDS and cancer raised apprehensions about safety to an analyst, and the number of specimens for analysis is increasing enormously. A modified determination replaces silica gel-TLC with disposable Florisil columns, and steps were simplified to allow more analyses per unit time. Data from the modified determination are quantitatively compatible with data from older and tedious procedures. This determination was used for blood from 36 diverse patients with allergies. The mean CoQ10 blood level of these patients is not different from the mean level of so-called normal individuals, but approximately 40% (14/36) of these allergic patients had levels up to 0.65 micrograms/ml, which is the level of dying class IV cardiac patients. The biosynthesis of CoQ10 in human tissues is a complex process that requires several vitamins and micronutrients, so that countless vitamin-unsupplemented Americans may be deficient in CoQ10. The relationship of allergies to autoimmune mechanisms and immunity, and the established relationship of CoQ10 to immune states, may be a rationale for therapeutic trials of administering CoQ10 to patients with allergies who have low CoQ10 blood levels and are very likely deficient.


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