Polyunsaturated (Essential) Fatty Acids and Their Importance in Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis
 
   

Polyunsaturated (Essential) Fatty Acids
and Their Importance in Pathogenesis,
Diagnosis and Therapy of
Multiple Sclerosis

This section was compiled by Frank M. Painter, D.C.
Send all comments or additions to:
  Frankp@chiro.org
 
   

FROM:   Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr 1982 (Jun);   50 (6):   173189

Seidel D


Various aspects concerning the pathogenetic involvement of polysaturated (essential) fatty acids as biochemical co-factors in developing multiple sclerosis (MS) are reported in great detail.   Our own studies have also confirmed that differences in the intake or utilization of essential fatty acids do not biochemically induce significant changes in myelin, serum or blood cells.   This has long been suspected.   The concept of nutritionally or metabolically induced generalized defects in all membranes, especially in the myelin sheath, as a predisposing factor to an increased susceptibility for the development of MS, provoked a gamut of pertinent studies frequently producing controversial results.   Hence, these conceptions concerning the pathogenetic involvement of essential fatty acids in MS have been put to rest - even more so after the role of prostaglandins in immunoregulation had become more apparent, whose biological precursors are essential fatty acids.   Thus, the immunosuppressive effect of high dosage of essential fatty acids under experimental conditions could be explained, disclosing new assessments concerning therapy, new pathogenetic models and further biochemical research.


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