Relationship of Serum Antioxidant Micronutrients and Sociodemographic Factors to Cervical Neoplasia: A Case-control Study
 
   

Relationship of Serum Antioxidant
Micronutrients and Sociodemographic
Factors to Cervical Neoplasia:
A Case-control Study

This section is compiled by Frank M. Painter, D.C.
Send all comments or additions to:
   Frankp@chiro.org
 
   

FROM: Clin Chem Lab Med 2009;   47 (8):   10051012

Cho H, Kim MK, Lee JK, Son SK, Lee KB,
Lee JM, Lee JP, Hur SY, Kim JH.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Gangnam Severance Hospital,
Yonsei University College of Medicine,
Seoul, Korea.


BACKGROUND:   Although there have been some epidemiological studies on the effects of diet and nutritional status on cervical carcinogenesis, evidence for a protective effect of antioxidant micronutrients against cervical neoplasia is insufficient. The relationship between serum antioxidant micronutrients and sociodemographic factors and the risk of cervical neoplasia was investigated in this multi-center, case-control study.

METHODS:   The study population included women with histopathological diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 (n=147), CIN 2/3 (n=177), cervical cancer (n=160), and a control group (n=378). Epidemiological data were collected and the serum concentrations of beta-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin plus lutein, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, and gamma-tocopherol were measured using reverse-phase, gradient high-pressure liquid chromatography.

RESULTS:   Cervical cancer was found to be associated with older age, increased body mass index, and lower socioeconomic status as measured by education level and income. The mean serum concentrations of beta-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin plus lutein, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, and gamma-tocopherol of cervical cancer patients were significantly lower than those of control subjects. Odds ratio adjusted for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and human papillomavirus infection status revealed a significant gradient of decreasing risk of CIN 1, CIN 2/3, and cervical cancer with increasing serum concentrations of most antioxidant micronutrients.

CONCLUSIONS:   The results of this study show an inverse association between serum antioxidant micronutrient concentrations and the risk of cervical neoplasia. These results suggest that antioxidant micronutrients play a role in the prevention of cervical carcinogenesis.


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