CONDITIONS THAT RESPOND WELL TO CHIROPRACTIC
 
   

Conditions That Respond Well to Chiropractic

This section was compiled by Frank M. Painter, D.C.
Make comments or suggestions to
  Frankp@chiro.org

Alternative Care Chiropractic

If there are terms in these articles you don't understand, you can get a definition from the Merriam Webster Medical Dictionary. If you want information about a specific disease, you can access the Merck Manual. You can also search Pub Med for more abstracts on this, or any other health topic.

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Conditions That Respond Well to Chiropractic
 
   

Hold your horses! Before you wade into the Conditions Section, please read Dr's. Nansel & Szlazak's fascinating JMPT article (see below), as it clarifies WHY chiropractic gets such dramatic results with a spectrum of purported diseases and disorders. You'll be glad you did!

  
Somatic Dysfunction and the Phenomenon of Visceral Disease Simulation:   A Probable Explanation for the Apparent Effectiveness of Somatic Therapy in Patients Presumed to be Suffering from True Visceral Disease
J Manipulative Physiol Ther 1995 (Jul);   18 (6):   379–397

The proper differential diagnosis of somatic vs. visceral dysfunction represents a challenge for both the medical and chiropractic physician. The afferent convergence mechanisms, which can create signs and symptoms that are virtually indistinguishable with respect to their somatic vs. visceral etiologies, need to be appreciated by all portal-of-entry health care providers, to insure timely referral of patients to the health specialist appropriate to their condition. Furthermore, it is not unreasonable that this somatic visceral-disease mimicry could very well account for the “cures” of presumed organ disease that have been observed over the years in response to various somatic therapies (e.g., spinal manipulation, acupuncture, Rolfing, Qi Gong, etc.) and may represent a common phenomenon that has led to “holistic” health care claims on the part of such clinical disciplines.



   
Asthma


   
Attention Deficit Disorder


   
Autism


   
Bell’s Palsy


   
Blindness/Visual Disorders


   
Blood Pressure


   
Cancer


   
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome


   
Cerebral Palsy


   
Chronic Neck Pain


   
Colic


   
Crohn's Disease


   
Deafness


   
Degenerative Joint Disease


   
Disc Herniation


   
Epilepsy


   
Female Issues


   
Fibromyalgia


   
Forward Head Posture


   
Gastroesophageal Reflux


   
Headache


   
Immune Function


   
Infertility


   
Low Back Pain


   
Maintenance Care and Wellness


   
Multiple Sclerosis


   
Nonmusculoskeletal (Visceral) Disorders


   
Otitis Media


   
Parkinson's Disease


   
Pregnancy-related Pain


   
Radiculopathy


   
Repetitive Stress


   
Scoliosis


   
Spinal Allignment/Cervical Curve


   
Spinal Pain


   
Stress


   
Subluxation


   
Temporomandibular Joint


   
Vertigo and Balance


   
Whiplash

 
   

More About Chiropractic
 
   

About Chiropractic Adjusting, a.k.a. Spinal Manipulation
The proper differential diagnosis of somatic vs. visceral dysfunction represents a challenge for both the medical and chiropractic physician. The afferent convergence mechanisms, which can create signs and symptoms that are virtually indistinguishable with respect to their somatic vs. visceral etiologies, need to be appreciated by all portal-of-entry health care providers, to insure timely referral of patients to the health specialist appropriate to their condition.


Instrument Adjusting, a.k.a. Mechanically-assisted Adjustments
This page gathers articles discussing the use of mechanically-assisted instrument adjusting. If you find any other articles that discuss instrument or drop-table adjusting, would you please contact me?


The Problem with Placebos/Shams
One obvious problem common to studies of physical-type treatments in general is an inadequate placebo treatment in the control or sham group. It is not inadequate in the classical sense of lacking a control group but inadequate in the sense that the sham control may be introducing a second active treatment in the supposed inert placebo intervention. This page discusses the “problem with placebos” in previous chiropractic research projects.


Chiropractic Care for Children?
Is Chiropractic care for children a controversial topic? Point–of–view (POV) pieces, like the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine article cited below, may be viewed as a sound basis for more research, or as a “call to arms” for those who consider chiropractic an unsupported “fringe” therapy. This page is devoted to reviewing the literature supporting the benefits and need for chiropractic care for children.


The Case Reports Section
Review many other case studies describing the impact of chiropractic in the new and improved Case Reports section.


Somatic Dysfunction and the Phenomenon of Visceral Disease Simulation: A Probable Explanation for the Apparent Effectiveness of Somatic Therapy in Patients Presumed to be Suffering from True Visceral Disease
J Manipulative Physiol Ther 1995 (Jul);   18 (6):   379–397

The proper differential diagnosis of somatic vs. visceral dysfunction represents a challenge for both the medical and chiropractic physician. The afferent convergence mechanisms, which can create signs and symptoms that are virtually indistinguishable with respect to their somatic vs. visceral etiologies, need to be appreciated by all portal-of-entry health care providers, to insure timely referral of patients to the health specialist appropriate to their condition. Furthermore, it is not unreasonable that this somatic visceral-disease mimicry could very well account for the “cures” of presumed organ disease that have been observed over the years in response to various somatic therapies (e.g., spinal manipulation, acupuncture, Rolfing, Qi Gong, etc.) and may represent a common phenomenon that has led to “holistic” health care claims on the part of such clinical disciplines.


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